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and baseball was never the same again

A dubious day in baseball history:

32 years ago today, the Designated Hitter became part of the game.

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» Bleeding Stopped from JimSpot
The bleeding has stopped and the season can now officially start. The Red Sox have won their first game... granted, it was after dropping two to the spankies, but they won one and it WAS against the spankies. ESPN.com -... [Read More]

» Horrific Moments in History from Leaning Towards the Dark Side
1973: Ron Blomberg becomes baseball's first Designated Hitter. Via Michele, the Yankee loving Satan.... [Read More]

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Thirty two years ago today, an atrocity was perpetrated. I have never forgiven the bastards who did this.... [Read More]

» BASEBALL: Dump the DH from Baseball Crank
Michele noted the dubious anniversary yesterday of the introduction of the DH. I had long tolerated the DH rule - and, more controversially the hybrid DH/no DH AL/NL setup - maybe just because it's what I grew up with. But... [Read More]

Comments

There is only one thing as despicable as DH: Inter-League Play.

Baseball would be better off if they got rid of these, even if they allowed steroids.

The DH is not a great solution, but do your REALLY want to watch a collection of guys who run only to the bathroom and bat a collective .087 flailing away at curve balls??

As for interleague play: Yankees-Mets SI, Royals-Rockies NO. Play up the natural geographic rivalries, but must we really be subjected to the unrequited drama of a Mariners- Phillies series. Aackkk....

Night baseball at Wrigley. A true mark of the devil.

The DH is not a great solution, but do your REALLY want to watch a collection of guys who run only to the bathroom and bat a collective .087 flailing away at curve balls??

Yup.

Like he said.

Won't somebody think of Harold Baines? He would have had to retire at 25 without it.

But National League baseball is superior, in that the guys-in-coaches-shorts-softball-leagues tendencies have been reduced.

Come on. Baseball is just a distraction while we wait for football season to start anyway. Why do these things matter?

Why shouldn't teams that have pitchers who can hit have a competitive advantage?

What the heck is so feckin' great about watching juiced up freaks hit pop flies that go 10 rows back in the outfield bleachers, anyway? I just don't get it...

(rhetorical questions above are not directed at Michele)

I don't get all the criticism of the DH spot. Even in the NL, pitchers usually end up bunting. Get some slugger in there to hit homers, drive up the score, and get people excited about baseball.

Lowering the hight of the pitchers mound and divisional play in '69, both are more evil then the DH.

As long as both teams play by the same rules, I don't care if they have the pitchers bat, a DH, or just skip the nine spot and go to the number one batter. It just doesn't matter.

Purity of the game? Night games, playoffs that go to November, artificial turf, the Athletics left Philadelphia, the Braves left Milwaukee, Brooklyn let a Black guy on the team, no more spitballs, the Dodgers left Brooklyn, free agency, strikes, $200 autographs, and The Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. Purity is a mixed bag.

Even in the NL, pitchers usually end up bunting.
Written by someone who never watches real baseball.

The DH rule results in the best pitchers facing the best hitters, backed up by the best fielders.

Why? Well the best pitchers play longer because they aren't forced to come out for a pinch hitter. The best hitters play because you're replacing a Punch & Judy hitter with a slugger. And the best fielders play because you aren't forced to do the double-switcheroo in the late innings.

I don't know about you, but I go to major league games to see the best play the best.

I keep reading that as Designated Hitler. Not sure what that says about me... or about baseball.

you only started this useless exercise to distract from the spankies loss. And Mo looking like a normal closer two days in a row.

Last year in the regular season, he only blew four. He might look normal to you, but Rivera didn't work out all winter, not touching a ball till Spring Training started, so his control is off the first couple of games. Big whoop. He'll straighten out. Watch. And when he does, get ready to weep.

Even in the NL, pitchers usually end up bunting.
Written by someone who never watches real baseball.
Bah! Vapors, all of them!

...but Rivera didn't work out all winter, not touching a ball till Spring Training started, so his control is off the first couple of games...

Have you seen his numbers against the Red Sox lately? He's blown four of the last six, and something like 14 of the last 24.

GO PHILS

Eliminating the DH would have two overdue beneficial effects. First, it would reduce the number and stress of pitches thrown by starting pitchers (it's easier to get past Al Leiter than David Ortiz), improving the ability of pitchers to go deep in games and to stay healthy. Seeing more of the best starters and less of marginal middle relievers is good.

Second, the DH is an extra everyday player. The more everyday players, the more opportunities for some teams (*cough*) to spend more money and thus gain advantages solely through their financial position. This is especially true of DHs, who tend to be well-paid veterans rather than cheap rookies.

In other words, eliminating the DH would mean better pitching and less economic inequality. It's time for the DH to go.

The DH rule results in the best pitchers facing the best hitters, backed up by the best fielders.

Except if/when the best hitters and pitchers are in the NL. And typically, when a pitcher would get pulled, he's not the "best pitcher" any longer.

And the best hitters in the league have generally not been DHers.

I'm not crazy about the DH but I like the setup where 1 league has it and 1 does not. I used to like interleague ball but dislike it now. I've grown to appreciate the differences between the leagues and would prefer that they be preserved.

DH = more offense
Steroids = lots more offense and cool new home run records!

Hell, we could get some REAL offense if we just got out of the 19th Century and legalized titanium alloy bats!!!

No American baseball fan has a long enough attention span to comprehend a double-switch anyway...

"The DH rule results in the best pitchers facing the best hitters, backed up by the best fielders."

Following that to its logical conclusion, we should have eighteen players per team, 9 on the field and 9 batting. For that matter, it would no longer matter how many batters you have as long as it's at least four. In fact, if we really want players to specialize, pitchers should not be required to field - they should have an assistant to field for them.

GAWD I hate that f***ing rule. Seriously [almost], if we are going to talk about disqualifying home run records set by behemoths on steroids we should also disqualify home run records set by DHs incapable of playing defense.

I rememember sitting cross-legged on the floor as an 8 year old listening to my brother discourse on the evils of the DH rule and why the world series will never be legit. again.

allowing alloy bats in the majors would result in 15-20 pitcher deaths in the first full year. There isn't a player in the majors who could react fast enough to handle a comebacker to the head.

Besides
a) the fact that when interleague (or WS) play takes place it puts AL teams at a major competitive advantage in their home parks since they have the money budgeted in for a full time DH (i.e. the NL team will have their 8-10th best hitter in the DH spot or filling another lineup spot because of the DH)
b) the enhancement of careers (and records and stats that go with that)

The newest discovered reason for the DH being bad is:
c) The DH has led to an increase in the number of hit batsman since a pitcher won't come to the plate to face retribution later in the game (which leads to the domino effect of the other team's pitcher being more likely to retaliate.) There have been some studies done that prove this statisically.

I just wrote an essay last week on this very subject.

And if the DH had been in effect back in 1918, we would have never seen Babe in the outfield and hitting homers. He still would have made the Hall of Fame, but it would have been as a pitcher--with the Red Sox.