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You Go Ahead and Play While I Work
Quiz and a Poll

Today turns out to be much busier at work than expected.

And I've decided to do the games post today and save the other stuff for the rest of the week.

While I'm trying to clear off my desk so I can blog without work-guilt, I've got a few things for you.

First, see if you can name all these games by the screenshots.

Second, a gaming poll. We've done the best arcade games, worst video games and tons of other polls here, but we've never covered the subject I am going to write about later: The Most Important Game EVER.

Nominate a game. State your case. We'll discuss it later.

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Quiz and a Poll
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Sure, Cagey throws me a bone and reminds me that the Atari 2600 was only # 9 in MobilePC's The Top 100 Gadgets of All Time, but come on, it's a magazine entitled Mobile PC--who could have foreseen that laptops and PDAs would weigh heavily? [Read More]

Comments

Space Invaders. Opened the US market to Japanese games. First game to break into the public consciousness since Pong. Made Arcades a viable business. Spawned a thousand imitators. Had a decent Atari 2600 port that helped send console sales into the stratosphere.

Major influence on Moonite design.

Major influence on Moonite design.

Haha. That made me giggle.

Someone's going to nominate it, might as well be me. Super Mario Bros.

First game to bring "lovable" characters onto the scene and create fierce loyalty to a game and a company. Us Nintendo kids scoffed at the Sega kids and their "Sonic". Mario came to symbolize the whole company and the video game industry as a whole in the mid-80s, his image pervasive throughout pop culture.

If you think the characters in Super Mario didn't affect you, remember how you felt the very first time you learned the Princess was in another castle.

Have to agree. The NES revived video games in the United States and Super Mario Brothers was that system's killer app.

If you think the characters in Super Mario didn't affect you, remember how you felt the very first time you learned the Princess was in another castle.

I believe my mother's words were: "Young man, I better never, ever hear that word come out of your mouth again!"

If you think the characters in Super Mario didn't affect you, remember how you felt the very first time you learned the Princess was in another castle.

I think my mouth hung open for about ten minutes and then i said What. The Fuck.

And kept playing.

Gran Turismo. Often imitated, never rivaled - this game is in a genre all its own. Nothing comes close.

Doom. The root of an entire genre.

I would also like to nominate Dragon Quest/Dragon Warrior. It was the beginning of an addiction that I continue to feed.

I would never be able to speak to myself again if I said anything other than Nethack.

How can you beat a game 18 years in the making (and counting)? No other game I've seen is so rich, so open-ended, so engaging. I've played plenty of new games of every genre, and I still haven't found any that keep my interest for more than a few weeks or so.

Donkey Kong. A genuine gateway game for Nintendo, even before the Super Mario games. The beginning of a videogame dynasty in the US.

I'll second Doom. That was the first video game that dragged me in and didn't let go. Wolfenstein was cool in a blank-wall, cartoony sort of way, but Doom really had ambience (and a BFG). I played a lot of the little bleep-bleep arcade games, which were addictive in the way that potato chips are, but none of them made me buy a new computer (a cutting edge 486 with 8!! megs of ram) just so I could play them. Doom was the Hendrix of video games.

Okay, I may take some heat for this, but I'm going to go with "Pong"
http://www.ideafinder.com/history/inventions/pong.htm

Reason being, it's the first video game to make it into the home. Opened up the market for all these other games that have been mentioned. If it hadn't been so widely successful my X-Box may not be sitting in my living room.

I'd have to say "Diplomacy", the first great multi-player game. In its own way, it inspired the role-playing games, the war games, and practically everything else.

Warcraft, it began the Generalship type sim. Which later became very versatile multi-playerly...

Panzer Blitz by Avalon Hill. Its popularity spawned the paper wargaming hobby that later morphed into the computer wargaming hobby.