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Grammar God!
You are a GRAMMAR GOD!

If your mission in life is not already to
preserve the English tongue, it should be.
Congratulations and thank you!

How grammatically sound are you?
brought to you by Quizilla Finally, majoring in English pays off.

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» Teh gramer and me!!11 from c0llision.org
Yet another pointless online test; this one is on grammar: You are a MASTER of the English language! While your English is not exactly perfect,you are still more grammatically correct thanjust about every American. Still, there isalways room for improv... [Read More]

» I Know you Always Suspected from Sunidesus Speaks
You are a GRAMMAR GOD! If your mission in life is not already topreserve the English tongue, it should be.Congratulations... [Read More]

» But Of Course I Is from The World Wide Rant - v3.0
You are a GRAMMAR GOD! If your mission in life is not already topreserve the English tongue, it should be.Congratulations and thank you! How grammatically sound are you? brought to you by Quizilla (courtesy of fellow grammatical deity, Michele)... [Read More]

» Other-Blogs Update from Hot Abercrombie Chick
I can't help taking those silly online quizes from time to time, and I wanted to see how well I'd score on this one. I was quite happy to also attain "Grammar God[dess]" status (though I don't think it's too difficult). [Read More]

» Other-Blogs Update from Hot Abercrombie Chick
I can't help taking those silly online quizes from time to time, and I wanted to see how well I'd score on this one. I was quite happy to also attain "Grammar God[dess]" status (though I don't think it's too difficult). [Read More]

» Grammar test from Texas Native
How good is your grammar? [Read More]

» In case you didn't know... from
Filtering Craig is a GRAMMAR GOD! If your mission in life is not already topreserve the English tongue, it should be.Congratulations and thank you! How grammatically sound are you? brought to you by Quizilla It just makes me angry that... [Read More]

» Grammatically speaking from sisu
"Thou shalt have no dangling participles before me." We passed "How grammatically sound are you?" with "GRAMMAR GOD!" colors. But of course. In our day, Word Wealth was our Bible, and they taught things like phonetics and even sentence [Read More]

» In the name of the Grammar, the Punctuation and the Rules of Spelling from Snooze Button Dreams
You are a GRAMMAR GOD! If your mission in life is not already topreserve the English tongue, it should be.Congratulations and thank you! How grammatically sound are you? brought to you by Quizilla (Snagged from Michele the Grammar Goddess)... [Read More]

» Well, of course .. from ***Dave Does the Blog
You are a GRAMMAR GOD! If your mission in life is not already topreserve the English tongue, it should... [Read More]

» Quiz time from CandyUniverse
BWAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!! You are a GRAMMAR GOD! If your mission in life is not already topreserve the English tongue, it should be.Congratulations and thank you! How grammatically sound are you? brought to you by Quizilla found at Michele's. Interestingly e... [Read More]

» Maybe Dad was right... from Mookie Riffic
You are a complete and utter BASTARDIZATIONof the English tongue! Unless this is your third language, there is absolutely no excuse for your ignorance. You shame us with your speech. Go back and finish your schooling, bastard. Its my first! Found Via X... [Read More]

» A Grammarboob Thinks I'm a Grammar God from damnum absque injuria
I've already said more than I wanted to say about that silly "How Grammatically Sound Are You?" quiz. Nutshell version: Yes, I got the highest possible score. No, I'm not particularly proud of that because the test is worthless.... [Read More]

» You and me, or you and I! CRAP from dawnolsen.com
Well I did better than Eric would have expected, and as always, there is room for improvement!! You are a MASTER of the English language! While your English is not exactly perfect,you are still more grammatically correct thanjust about every... [Read More]

» How's Your Grammar? from CALIFORNIA YANKEE
The California Yankee passed this test. You are a GRAMMAR GOD! If your mission in life is not already topreserve the English tongue, it should be.Congratulations and thank you! How grammatically sound are you? brought to you by Quizilla Thanks [Read More]

» Divine grammarian sends ugly chick to Seattle! from Classical Values
It's Good Friday, which is nonetheless Online Test Day at Classical Values, so I dare not break with tradition, although I do promise to try to be good. The first test has gotten around quite a bit. I've seen it... [Read More]

Comments

Ooh ooh - good quiz, I got the same!

I received divine ascension to Grammar God as well. Translation for those who didn't do so well: wOOt, I b teh l33t ling0 p1mp.

I, too, am a Grammar God....or Goddess.

I'd like to thank the nuns at St. Mary's, and especially my mom, whose raised eyebrow spoke volumes whenever we let a "me and her" slip out unheeded.

Got the God status,like Trish,thanks to the penguins at St Cletus,St Agnes , St Procopius and my bad-ass, grammatically correct mama bear.

sigh I'm only a master.

Oh, oh! I be one of them grammar god's too!

Heh.

Someone needs to rein in the would-be grammar gods. This "grammar quiz" is a POS. Here's why:

  • In #6, the question of whether Chrissy's teacher asked her to "bring" or "take" the book to Room 22 depends on where Chrissy's teacher was at the time she made the request. If the request was made in Room 22, then "bring" was appropriate. If it was made anywhere else, the word should be "take."
  • In #8, the proper pronoun for everybody is he, not they or she. That option was even on the list of potential answers.
  • #11 is based on a canard that mistakes the very definition of the word infinitive.
  • #15 is hopelessly pedantic. The use of "less" for count nouns as well as mass nouns is widely accepted, so the correct answer here was "either is acceptable" (not on the list, of course).
  • #16 has nothing to do with grammar; it's about punctuation, and given the disagreement over the relevant rules from country to country, it's really just a test of which English-speaking country you were born and raised in. [Yes, I know about that moronic rule about ending sentences with prepositions; it's a rule up with which I cannot put.]

    BTW, lest anyone write off my carping as sour grapes, I score "grammar god," too.

  • Party Pooper.

    I also am a "Grammar God[dess]" - I think it must have been too easy.

    I was only a master. But in my defence (or... defense...), I'm Canadian and so I think I should get bonus points or something. We have a different kind of english up here. As far as this test goes, coloUr me unimpressed :-)

    I also have God-like grammar recognition abilities. Unfortunately I don't have this sort of omnipotence in what computer people call "real time".

    Also I prefer short sentences. Even if they're frangments.

    Xrlq

    Re #6,
    Modern grammar teachers have decided that all that Latin "motion towards" stuff is obsolete and no longer applies to English.

    #8 I don't have the test in front of me, but maybe I should point out that political correctness has changed English grammar so that the style manuals now allow you to use a plural so that you can avoid specifying gender. That's a change that happened in record time. So the rules about plurals have changed.

    #16

    You've got me interested. I HATE the rules I was taught about quotations - they break the concept of quotations too badly. Is there a country where you can put the comma outside of the quotes, or at least put quoted punctuation inside reliably?

    Beware the grammar test with poor spelling...

    #7. (blank) faced turned a bright shade of red

    (OK, it's just a typo, but still...)

    A preposition is a terrible thing to end a sentence with.

    This is disturbing.
    You see my formal education only
    extends K thru 8 yet I scored
    Grammer God.
    This leads me to suspect that
    either the test is faulty or
    all those hours in the prison
    libarry :) are worth a sheepskin.

    I am a complete idiot! Yeah! Grammer has always been and always will be my bane. Luckily I work in a visual medium.

    I agree that the test is a POS (even though I was deemed godlike). I disagree with XRLQ about 15, though. The less/fewer thing is still a proper rule of grammar, and is most certainly NOT widely accepted. It differs from the split-infinitives rule, which is not just archaic, but was wrong when first proposed (English infinitives are not Latin infinitives).

    The quote thing irked me, too. There are several competing schools of thought on that one. I prefer so-called "logical quoting", which puts only puts punctuation inside the quotation marks if the punction is part of the quotation.

    I are a Grammer God!

    (Me fail english? That's unpossible!)

    me two are god off grammer! yay!

    Ok, I ranked Grammar God[dess], too.

    At one time I did want to teach high school English; however, I believe much of my writing skills came from those years (long gone) as an executive secretary (back when that was a profession).

    oh... and a ps...

    composing direct on the 'puter really screws with one's grammar skills.

    :-)

    OMG, I scored BASTARDIZATION! And they couldn't just leave it at that. They told me: "You shame us with your speech. Go back and finish your schooling, bastard."

    >:(.....o

    Hey, I scored the same.

    Since I am a technical writer by profession, this came as a relief!

    WG

    Damn you, IgwanaRob, for beating me to the Ralph Wiggum quote. There's a special level of hell for quote stealers such as yourself.

    Anyway, I too am a grammar God. Qualifying for a British passport comes with a stipulation that grammar must be flawless at all times. Really.

    I, too, am a Grammar God!

    This despite the fact that they included one FALSE, PHONY GRAMMATICAL RULE which was invented out of whole cloth for no good reason, and which deserves to die a long-overdue death.

    As you can see, I was lucky not to have any questions involving run-on sentences.

    Alright, I'm a Grammar God, too. This quiz needs more questions, so there can be an even HIGHER status, since this divinity thing appears to be getting a bit crowded. Or lower the current gods to mere demigods, or something.

    I teach English as a second language and I am astounded to hear Americans speaking on movies and tv programs and the news making so many grammatical mistakes. The most common one is saying - for example - "There is a lot of things." It should be "There ARE a lot of things." I hear this all the time!

    Grammar God, thanks more to Latin than English.

    Spoons, I've never heard of the "logical quoting" method, it's intriguing. I was taught that quotations with a "he said" require a comma, but it can be a pain to include it every time.

    Joshua:
    #8: If you're too P.C. to use the appropriate pronoun for "everyone" or "everybody," the grammatical solution is not to use these words at all, or at least not as the antecedent to any pronoun. By asking for "they," the test is not measuring whether you are a grammar god, but rather, an ungrammatical PC God.

    #16: I'm not sure exactly what the British rule is. Take this random article from the Independent. The quotes in paragraphs 4 and 6 seem to follow the same conventions as the U.S., but the 12th and last one does not.

    Spoons:
    #15: the use of "less" as a substitute for "fewer" may not be universally accepted, but it is widely accepted, even by many of those who claim not to accept it - yet say it all the time without thinking. See the usage note on the dictionary entry for few. To my ears, at least, a sentence like "give your reasons in 25 words or fewer" sounds horrendous.

    XRLQ:

    If by "Widely accepted" you mean "widely-screwed-up," I am in complete agreement.

    The only reason your example "sounds horrendous" (as though that were a valid grammatical criterion) is that you juxtaposed two plurals to close together. If you said "state your opinion in 25 words or fewer," it sounds just fine.

    Jonathan: that the application of a supposed grammatical rule results in a sentence that "sounds horrendous" to the average native speaker is indeed a valid basis for questioning the rule itself. There is no ultimately "right" or "wrong" grammar in any absolute sense, only descriptively adequate grammars (which accurately describe how the language is spoken), and descriptively inadequate ones (which fail to do so). The notion that "less" can never be used with count nouns is descriptively inadequate, and if applied consistently enough, results in sentences no native speaker would ever utter under ordinary, non-contrived circumstances. That's a problem for the rule, not for the speakers who flout it.

    I don't see how the presence of a plural in a separate phrase affects my example, one way or the other. It may well be that "State your opinion in 25 words or fewer" sounds OK in your idiolect, but it sounds horrible in mine. Here's an even worse example of the "right" rule, consistently applied:

    What kind of apartment can I get in N.Y. for $2,000 or fewer?

    I know what you mean, Chaya. I get the fingernails-down-the-chalkboard willies whenever I hear someone using the phrase "a whole 'nother"

    "$2,000 or less" is a gray area, because really, that phrase would not be understood as signifying a number of dollars (after all, who would pay their rent with 2000 singles), but an amount of money.

    Think of it this way: we don't ask, "How many dollars does that cost." We say, "How much does that cost."

    That's because "money" is a non-count noun. I think that expressions of amounts of money, such as $25 or $2000, signify an amount of non-count noun money, rather than a quantity of count-noun dollars.

    I also majored in English and ended up the Grammar God. Big woo for me and you.

    Money is a mass noun, but dollar is not. While it may sound a bit odd to ask "How many dollars" something costs rather than how much, that's a problem of semantics and/or pragmatics, not grammar. Normally, the currency is assumed, so bringing it up in the question sounds odd. On the other hand, if someone just got done telling you how much something costs in rubles, "how many dollars does that cost" strikes me as a perfectly reasonable follow-up question. By contrast, "how much dollar(s)..." is never grammatical, as it would be if English grammar treated the word dollars as a mass noun like money..

    I'm not even a Gramper God.

    My quiz result said "You are the one true Grammar God. We thought Michele was good enough for God status, but you blew her skinny ass away! She screwed up the who, whom question, along with the other commenters claiming God status, but you, you absolute stud, you nailed them all!" Just thought I'd share.