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this is a memorial

Oklahoma City.

The Gates of Time: These monumental twin gates frame the moment of destruction - 9:02 - and mark the formal entrances to the memorial. Reflecting Pool: A shallow depth of gently flowing water soothing wounds, with calming sounds and peaceful setting for quiet thoughts.

Field of Empty Chairs: The 168 chairs stands as a poignant reminder of each life lost, articulated as the absence felt by family members and friends.

Children's Area: A wall of hand-painted tiles sent to Oklahoma City in 1995 by children illustrates their care. in addition, a series of chalkboards creates an opportunity for children to share their feelings - an important part of the healing process.

Rescuers Orchard: Like those who rushed in from far and near to lend a helping hand, this army of fruit and flowering bearing trees surrounds and protects the Survivor's Tree.

The Survivor's Tree: The Survivor's Tree, an American Elm, bears witness to the violence of April 19 and now stands as a profound symbol of human resilience.

The Memorial Fence: The Memorial Fence continues to display items left by visitors, which are dedicated to Family Members, Survivors, and Rescue Workers.
photos from here

It's personal. It's human. It's incredibly touching and moving. It does a much better job of representing both the victims and the tragedy than the NYC memorial could ever hope to obtain.

I love the idea Jeff Jarvis submitted:

This memorial will use video to tell the stories of every person who died on September 11th. With family photos, home movies, and tributes from loved ones – in image and in word – leading news producers and filmmakers will work with families to create films of one- to three-minutes in length about each of the fallen.

I am going to embark on a mission to get Jeff to make his idea happen, even if it isn't the "official" memorial of 9/11.

I think that's the last of my memorial-related posts for now. Sorry for the single-mindedness of the last 24 hours or so.

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» http://www.allahpundit.com/archives/000190.html from Allah Is In The House
The creator of worlds is spent after yesterday's climactic Dean-o Photoshop and shall require a little "recovery time" before he feels in the mood again. Allah's male readers know where he is coming from. In the meantime, go forth, Satans,... [Read More]

Comments

Apologies unecessary.

I dunno, I think Lileks was right about ideas like that:

Re: the WTC memorial: I wanted statuary. A broad wall with the name of the dead. A monument with allegorical figures, thank you. Grief and Pain Comforted by Hope – sure, make it that obvious. As much as I like some of the designs, especially the Garden of Light, they seem too high-maintenance. You can already imagine the sign on the door: The Garden of Light is closed today for repairs. Statues tell the story when the power goes off; statues don’t need sheltering from the elements. Statues stand for a hundred years, and I cannot imagine any of these memorials lasting that long. There are memorials in Fargo for the First World War, and if they’d required electricity and gramophone cylinders they long ago would have fallen into disrepair. But the statue of the GAR soldier still stands in Island Park. He’s not going anywhere. Don’t even try.

Permanence matters. This is NY's Alamo, its Pearl Harbor. The memorial should be built to remind generations not yet born.

Todd and I went back to see the OKC Memorial for the first time last fall. (Photos here and here.) I couldn't have made it through without looking through a camera lens as I went. We were both incredibly shocked/saddened by how "sterile" the proposed WTC memorial looked in comparison.

I'm an expat Okie who visited the OKC Memorial and came away profoundly moved. It is a place of reverence and remembrance. It honors the lost individuals in a meaningful way--those empty chairs are a simple, stark statement of personal and corporate loss. My girls, 11 and 13, know how some of the people lost their lives in the bombing, and they seek out those peoples' chairs when we visit. Yet the place also memorializes those who survivied and those who came to help in the best way possible--through living reminders (the Survivor's Tree and the Rescuer's Orchard). I ache when I visit, but I look forward to each visit because the place has been designed to be personal.

I can't imagine visiting the proposed 9|11 memorial and feeling the same way. It looks cold and unfeeling, and there's no reverence or remembrance built into it. I earnestly pray that they scrap this choice and start over.

The OKC Memorial is even better, at night. One of these days, I'm going to take a view camera there, and do it right.

Riyadh delenda est!

I have visited the OKC memorial. It is beautifully done. It has special meaning as one of my cousins was in the bank just down the block from where the explosion occured, he was in the middle of the massive confusion afterwards.
The design of that memorial is so apt. It causes the lingering emotions of those who would have filled the empty chairs.
I still do not like the design for WTC. :(